Posts from the ‘Technology’ category

We use type all the time without really thinking about how and why we make the choices we do. As a picture book writer type is really important to me because the choices we make affect how our readers respond to the text. Typography is like a visual form of our voice – we can shout or whisper, we can talk fast or slow – it’s a wonderful way of illustrating what our voice can do. In my Type Faces Workshop we will learn about the anatomy of type, font families and design basics. I will share how type is used in everyday life – from street signs to newspapers, from cereal boxes to book covers  – and how the type we use can affect the way we communicate. In the session we will play my Font Families game, learn to think like a picture book designer and use technology to create our own Type Face posters:

 

 

To book an amazing Type Faces Workshop for your KS1/2 class, get in touch with Pippa here…

 

comicbook coverHot off the press is this colourful and creative look at the language of comicbook culture that I produced with Key Stage 1 children at Hollinsclough Cof E (VA) Primary School in the Peak District.

I really enjoyed working in a lovely rural setting with a small class that included children from Reception through to Year 2. They were already in the middle of a topic about superheroes. We had great fun running around in capes and masks as we came up with lots of alliteration, onomatopoeia, and exclamatory punctuation!!!

The children created challenges to overcome including a crazy lego robot, a prehistoric plasticine monster and a massive meteor headed straight for earth. They used the ComicLife app for iPad to make their own strip designs and starred in action trailer we made using iMovie. Then their hand-drawn callouts and captions were combined with photographs of their roleplay to make the finished book.

If you would like a Storybook Creation Project for your school read more  . . .

ipad teddy image

I’ve been invited to act as Creative Consultant for a year long project researching the best practice for, and impacts of, introducing Apple mobile devices into six Early Years settings across Merseyside. I’m really keen to be involved with this Digital Journeys project because it promises to answer some real questions about the effectiveness of using ICT with such young learners, whether as continuous provision or in practitioner guided sessions. I am aware that many are sceptical about this…

Too much engagement with this quick-fix technology is making it more difficult for some children to learn to read and write.

Sue Palmer, author of Toxic Childhood

The project is lead by Ann Langston of Early Years Matters who was involved in writing the current Early Years Framework so I look forward to gaining the insights that her experience will bring to our planning, cluster meetings and evaluations. My role will be to provide training to the lead teachers from each participating school to smooth the way as they get to grips with the iPads and iPod Touches that the local education authority is supplying. Aside from “IT support” I’ll be sharing creative ideas about how to integrate features and apps with fun and hands-on activities that will help the children to engage with learning and develop core skills. The best part is that there is sufficient funding for me to visit each setting to provide additional support and see some of my suggestions put into practice…

“If Early Years continues to focus exclusively on traditional forms of literacy, then it will be failing to provide all children with the skills they will need at school and in their future lives.”

Dr Rosie Flewitt, Multimodal Literacies in the Early Years, ESRC 2011

image wet camera

I have a whole drawer full of destroyed compact cameras! I usually take a box full with me when I work in schools, but very often they get dropped or otherwise mangled. So I’ve bought a batch of  Fujifilm XP series cameras that claim to be waterproof, shockproof and freezeproof!!! Let’s hope they are…

light sculpture image

I had to stand as still as a statue for this light sculpture artwork created by fellow photographer Tristan Brady-Jacobs at yesterday’s celebration event for Curious Minds. I think even he was impressed at the striking results of this image captured on campus at Lancaster University! Thanks to everyone involved…